2D animations: Using Spine 2D

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Finally it’s here, my last post about 2D animation for Unity, and today it’s turn for Spine2D.

Spine 2D is a software created for 2D animation exclusively, external to Unity but with a plug in to include any animation in any Unity project. It worth the pain or is better to use any of the Unity built in options we have seen before?  Click on read more to find out!

Spine interface

Spine interface

 

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Using Spritesheets with Unity3D

New week, new article here!

In my last post, I’ve started a new series of posts related to 2D animations for Unity3D with a short introduction to Unity3D Mecanim. Today is time to import some sprite sheets into Unity and try to get an animation from them.

I personally love crafting my own sprite sheets by hand, I feel my 2D animations much more under control, but for this article I’m using a finished sprite sheet. If some wants to know more about how sprite sheets are made, give a look to this post from the good old times. Before adding it to Unity, check if the size of your sprite sheet is power 2 sized (512*512, 1024*512, 1080*1024…) to avoid further issues.

Spite sheets in Unity 3D

Spite sheets in Unity 3D

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Introduction to Unity Animator

In small projects everyone needs to wear multiple hats. That’s why I’m usually coder, designer and animator in most of my games, and I’m not creating sound effects and music because I literally have no time to learn about it.

For that reason I’ve taken a look to some methods to include 2D animations in all the Unity projects I’m creating while I get used to the engine. For now I’ve tested Spine2D, 2D sprites and the animator that Unity provides as a built-in feature, and this article is an introduction to the last one.

 

Unity Animator's curves view

Unity Animator’s curves view

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Learning from failure

Last week Sergio and I signed for the “it’s a race” Mini Ludum Dare and he did a pretty good work with his Boost Power, but the same can’t be said about me.  This one has been my first game jam where I tried my best, but at the end I didn’t make it. It’s a shame, but I still think that still worth it.

My try is about a little mole fleeing  from a sure death under the horrific mower of doom. You can help the little mole by smashing your keyboard and evading some obstacles jumping over them. My hours playing Track & Field some years ago have to take some blame for my smashing button addiction.

Click the following image to access the “game”

My failed game for the mini LD. Click to play

My failed game for the mini LD. Click to play

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Particles 2: Emitters and tools

Hey! You have 6 minutes? That’s what you need to see what’s going on here! 

Boss has been lashing me restless for days because I forgot to mention one of the most important things about particle systems and effects in the first post of  my particle series: emitters! We’re fixing this right now! I don’t want to be punished for this error anymore T_T

Particle emitters! Because it is high time

In the first particle’s post I explained a bit about particles life, a basic particle engine design and how particle effects works for dummies, but I miss to explain where the particles comes from!

Every particle system has an emitter and there is where particles are born. Emitters can be a point, a plane or even a 3D object, and particles can be created at the edges, the vertices or even the faces of them. In a pure 2D scenario an emitter can have 1 or 2 dimensions (well, that’s obvious xD).

Once a particle has been created, always from some point at the emitter surface (or inside the emitter in 3D scenarios), it will move, jump, shine or whatever it’s meant for, then it’ll die after a while, at the same time more particles are being created at the emitter, ready to complete their tasks.

particle emitter example

particle emitter example

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